By: Byron Mathioudakis

Electric vehicle (EV) sales continue to grow in Australia and while the range of models on offer here is still relatively small, it is gradually increasing.

This year even more electric SUVs have been arriving on our shores and with West Aussie’s love affair with the SUV, that’s even more reason to start considering an electric future.

So, here’s an update of the electric SUV’s available in Australia right now as well as others arriving throughout the year.

The cars listed here are all SUVs. For non-SUVs, see our run down of other electric cars coming to Australia in 2022.

Production delays may push these timings out (and prices ever upward), but here’s what we know for now.

RELATED: Electric car charging costs »
RELATED: Government incentives for EV purchases in Australia »

MG ZS EV II from $46,990 driveway

2022 MG ZS EV Series-II electric car

The MG ZS EV from China used to be Australia’s cheapest EV, but the Series II facelift from mid-2022 changes that.

A new base grade called Excite has been added, and it’s nearly 10 per cent more than the old Essence it replaces, yet loses the latter’s blind spot monitor, rear cross-traffic alert, panoramic sunroof, heated and powered front seats, electrically folding mirrors and more. For these, you’ll need the new Essence that costs nearly 15% extra compared to before.

Plus, the battery warranty falls one year, to seven years.

Speaking of which, a 50kW DC fast charger needs about one hour to replenish 80 percent of the all-new, 51kWh battery pack, while a 7kW Wallbox at home/work needs under about nine hours, as opposed to 25 hours using a normal household plug.

At the time of writing it was unclear whether the new ZS would get a more powerful electric motor. Performance from the existing 105kW motor is adequate, and while the MG corners acceptably, the suspension’s ride can feel too stiff and jittery.

Along with the mandatory blanked-out grille, the 2022 facelift brings a larger centre touchscreen and all-digital instrumentation. The interior is pleasant, there’s plenty of space and the boot is quite large for a small SUV.

Still, the MG ZS EV is no longer a bargain.

MG ZS EV
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/FWD
Battery: 51kWh Lithium Iron Phosphate
Power/torque: 105kW/350Nm
0-100km/h: N/A
Consumption: 17.3kWh/100km
Electric range: 320km
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 7yr/unlimited km
Safety rating: 5 stars

BYD Atto 3 from $47,931

 2022 BYD Atto 3 electric car

The Atto 3 was the first volume BYD car sold in Australia.

Badged as Yuan Plus in China, the Atto 3 is chasing MG ZS EV buyers, with the importer Nextport selling them via its EV Direct website.

Like the ZS, the BYD is a small SUV offering a high-riding five-seater body style. It also features a futuristically-designed dashboard, plenty of space all-round and decent equipment levels, including a long list of driver-assist safety gear, sunroof, electric front seats and powered tailgate.

Boot space varies from 434 litres to 1330L with rear backrests folded.

Built on a new, dedicated EV platform, the Atto 3 employs a 150kW/310Nm electric motor which drives the front wheels, and more densely packed cells in the battery pack, increasing its energy density. Acceleration and general performance are said to be lively.

Buyers can choose two battery sizes. The Superior’s 49.9kWh pack offers 320km while the aptly-named Superior Extended Range for a $3000 premium boasts a 60.4kWh unit to push range out to 420km. Charging times are to be confirmed.

Note that no BYD dealerships exist in Australia, meaning servicing is carried out at MyCar (formerly K-Mart Auto) locations nationwide.

BYD Atto 3 Superior/Superior Extended Range
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet 
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/FWD
Battery: 50.1/60.4kWh Lithium Iron Phosphate
Power/torque: 150kW/310Nm
0-100km/h: 7.3s
Consumption: 14.4-15.7kWh/100km
Electric range: 320/420km (WLTP)
Warranty: 7yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 7yr/160,000km
Safety rating: N/A

Hyundai Kona EV from $54,500

 2022 Hyundai Kona Electric car

Going electric may double the Kona’s price compared to the normal petrol versions, but as an EV, the small SUV impresses with its user-friendly nature, excellent range and brisk point-to-point acceleration that makes it fun to drive.

2021 brought a second, cheaper powertrain option known as Standard Range (SR). It gains a less-powerful front-mounted electric motor (at 100kW) and a smaller battery (at 39.2kWh).

The latter offers 305km of WLTP range, compared to the 484km promised by the more-expensive Long Range (LR), with its 150kW electric motor and 64kWh battery pack.

Charging from 10 to 80 per cent needs around 50 minutes (SR) or 65 minutes (LR) using a 50kW DC public fast charger. Otherwise, it’s about six and nine hours respectively to 100% using an optional 7kW AC Wallbox at home/work, to avoid the 33 hours needed using a regular wall socket.

Being a small SUV, space is fine up front if a little tight for legroom in the back. Compromises compared to the petrol Kona include a smaller boot and loss of a spare wheel to a tyre-inflation kit.

Still, the Kona EV is more affordable than ever, making it a great first electric-car experience.

Hyundai Kona EV Standard Range/Long Range
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/FWD
Battery: 39kWh/64kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 100kW or 150kW/395Nm
0-100km/h: 9.9s/7.9s
Consumption: 14.7 kWh/100km
Electric range: 305/484km
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Cupra Born from $60,000 (estimated)

2022 Cupra Born electric car

Part of the Volkswagen Group, Cupra is the sports division of the Seat brand from Spain, which makes the Born – due later this year – an interesting choice as the German conglomerate’s first EV in Australia.

Named after a Barcelonan district, the German-built Born employs VW’s MEB EV architecture, and is heavily based on the VW ID.3 not available locally.

Strikingly styled, the Mazda 3-sized five-seater, five-door hatchback certainly possesses a performance vibe, and continues that theme inside with bolstered seats and racy trim, while still providing decent space and practicality.

Keeping in mind Cupra’s performance aspirations, Australians should initially only see the 150kW electric motor version, offered in 58kWh and/or 77kWh battery sizes, in rear-drive or all-wheel drive configurations.

As such, over 500km of range between charges should be possible, underlining the Born’s competitiveness against the likes of Tesla’s Model Y and Hyundai Ioniq 5. Charging times should take around 30 hours with a wall plug, or overnight with an 11kW Wallbox. Find a 50kW-plus public fast charger and 80 per cent is achievable in around an hour or less.

Offering strong performance and keen handling, the Born should be the hot hatch for the EV generation.

Cupra Born
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/RWD or AWD
Battery: 58kWh or 77kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 150kW/310Nm
0-100km/h: 7.3s
Consumption: 15.5-16.7kWh/100km
Electric range: Up to 548km (WLTP)
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: N/A

Kia Niro II EV from $65,000 (estimated)

2022 Kia Niro EV II electric car

You’re looking at the second-generation Niro EV, barely a year after launching in Australia – though it dated back to 2016 elsewhere.

A twin to the Hyundai Ioniq Electric underneath, the redesigned Niro II EV builds on its predecessor’s family-friendly crossover shape with more space and practicality, including a substantially larger (at 475 litres) rear cargo area plus a new, 20L boot up front. Likewise, the user-friendly dash is light years ahead in style and features.

The Kia will again be available in hybrid and plug-in hybrid guises, meaning it doesn’t employ the Hyundai Group’s vaunted new E-GMP EV architecture, but an updated version of the old platform.

As before, a 150kW electric motor drives the front wheels. Range improves slightly (to an impressive 463km), but while torque levels plummet by 140Nm, acceleration levels remain the same. Odd.

Plugging the Kia in a household socket should need 33 hours to replenish the 64.8kWh battery; an optional 11kW Wallbox will slash that to seven hours, while a 50kW DC public fast charger will take around 70 minutes.

Easy, spacious and comfortable, but now with fresher styling, more advanced driver-assist safety and improved efficiency, the Niro EV deserves a good, hard look.

Kia Niro II EV
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/FWD
Battery: 64.8kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 150kW/255Nm
0-100km/h: 7.8s
Consumption: 16.4kWh/100km
Electric range: 463km (WLTP)
Warranty: 7yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: N/A

Mazda MX-30 EV from $65,490

2022 Mazda MX-30 electric car

Yes, there’s a mild-hybrid petrol MX-30; but the EV version is the more important model, as Mazda’s first zero tailpipe emissions model in Australia.

Related to the CX-30 – itself a Mazda3 small-car derivative – the MX-30 is a coupe/SUV/crossover aimed at buyers prioritising style over practicality. Hence the fiddly ‘Freestyle’ rear-hinged rear doors and smallish boot for an SUV this size.

Mazda’s lifestyle EV also departs from the EV norm by purposely having a smaller and lighter battery – its 35.5kWh unit is half the size of the Hyundai Ioniq 5’s, for instance. In contrast, the smaller Mercedes EQA weighs almost 300kg more.

The Japanese maker reckons most EV buyers value the faster charging, nimbler handling and the reduced carbon footprint that the more-compact battery brings.

An optional 7kW Wallbox charger will have the MX-30 recharged in 5.5 hours, while a regular household socket needs 15.5 hours. On the flipside, total range is just 200km. That, Mazda argues, is more than sufficient for most daily commutes.

Like all MX-30s, the five-seater interior is lovely to behold, well-equipped and quite roomy. It isn’t fast, but the Mazda is quiet, comfortable and enjoyable to drive.

Too bad the range is so limited for something so pricey.

Mazda MX-30 EV
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/FWD
Battery: 35.5kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 107kW/271Nm
0-100km/h: 9.7s
Consumption: 15.0-19.0 kWh/100km
Electric range: 200km
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Kia EV6 from $67,990

2022 Kia EV6 electric car

Although the EV6 is Kia’s second EV after the Niro, it’s the brand’s first dedicated one, using the same e-GMP electric architecture as the Hyundai Ioniq 5.

Along with its own body and interior, the EV6 also benefits from a unique Australian handling and ride tune.

Using a 72.4kWh battery pack, the EV6 Long Range comes as either a rear-mounted 168kW electric motor rear-drive model, or 74kW-front/165kW-rear 239kW dual-motor all-wheel drive guise.

All EV6s are rapid, but the coming 430kW GT flagship can hit 100km/h in 3.5 seconds and reach 260km/h. A base 54kWh Standard Range with low-$60,000 pricing is set for 2023.

With an 800V electrical set-up, battery charging from 10 to 80 per cent using a 50kW DC public fast charger needs 75 minutes. Otherwise, 100% full using an optional 11kW or 7kW Wallbox at home/work takes 7.5 hours and 12 hours respectively, to avoid a 37-hour wait plugged into a regular wall socket.

The EV6’s cabin looks as premium as the SUV’s exterior is swoopy, dominated by huge touchscreen designs incorporating multimedia and instrumentation.

Factor in ample space, generous equipment levels, leading safety and progressive good looks, and Kia’s impressive form continues with the EV6.

Kia EV6
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet 
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/RWD or AWD
Battery: 58kWh to 72.4kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 168kW/350Nm and 239kW/605Nm
0-100km/h: 7.3s/5.2s
Consumption: 16.5-18 kWh/100km
Electric range: Up to 528km
Warranty: 7yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: N/A

Tesla Model Y from $72,300 (estimated)

2022 Tesla Model Y electric car

Though based on the compact Model 3 sedan, the Model Y is longer, taller and wider, putting it firmly in the medium-SUV size bracket.

Finally on sale now after almost three years of delays, two grades with dual motors are offered initially – the Long Range with 505km of range and the flagship Performance, dropping range down to 480km but capable of exceeding 240km/h. Highlighting the Y’s sporty focus, acceleration is strong right from the get-go, backed up by sharp handling and exceptional all-weather grip.

Tesla’s Supercharger Network of EV stations can provide hundreds of kilometres of charge in about one hour, or otherwise it increases to 1.5 days plugged in at home, around 12 and eight hours using an optional Wallbox of 7kW and 11kW capacity respectively. Alternatively, finding a 50kW DC fast charger needs 75 minutes.

Like the Model 3, the Y adopts the minimalist tablet dashboard look, while deep windows bring a spacious and airy feel. Where fitted, the third row can be laid flat to increase cargo capacity beneath the tailgate.

Options should include Autopilot, bringing automatic lane changing, automated parking and adaptive cruise control, while like all Teslas, over-the-air software updates will also be a feature.

Further Model Y upgrades may arrive at a later date.

Tesla Model Y Long Range and Performance 
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/AWD
Battery: 62.3 and 82kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 324kW/439Nm and 413kW/660Nm
0-100km/h: 5.0s and 3.7s
Consumption: 16.9 and 17.1 kWh/100km
Electric range: 505km and 480km
Warranty: 4yr/80,000km
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Hyundai Ioniq 5 from $71,900

Hyundai Ioniq 5 electric car

The Ioniq 5 is already a global EV superstar. And its excellence is rooted in the advanced E-GMP dedicated EV architecture as per the Kia EV6 and Genesis GV60.

Available in rear-mounted 160kW electric motor rear-drive or dual-motor (155kW-rear/70kW-front) all-wheel-drive permutations, the Hyundai features a 72.6kWh battery pack dubbed Long Range. Over 400km of real-world distance is possible.

The Ioniq 5’s 800V electrical set-up means battery charging from 10 to 80 per cent needs around 60 minutes using a 50kW fast charger. Otherwise, it’s about eight and 11 hours to 100% using an optional 11kW or 7kW Wallbox at home/work, to avoid the 36 hours plugged into a regular wall socket.

An optional roof-mounted solar panel provides some on-the-move charging. Clever.

About Kia Seltos sized, this quasi-SUV EV brings a spacious, versatile and highly-modern interior, a 12.0-inch touchscreen multimedia system, an augmented reality head-up display and huge 531-litre cargo capacity – with more available in the front boot. Much of the materials inside is recycled.

Finally, advanced driver-assist technology makes the Ioniq 5 a safety leader.

By the end of 2022 a 54kWh Standard Range base grade is expected, meaning the starting price should drop to around $65,000, further cementing Hyundai’s EV leadership.

Hyundai Ioniq 5 RWD/AWD
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/RWD or AWD
Battery: 72.6kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 160kW/350Nm, 225kW/605Nm
0-100km/h: 8.5s/5.2s
Consumption: 17.9-19.0 kWh/100km
Electric range: 430/451km
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Volvo XC40 Recharge Pure Electric from $72,990

2022 Volvo XC40-Recharge electric car

Volvo’s first pure EV is the XC40 Recharge Pure Electric.

Launched in 2021, the Chinese-sourced small SUV arrived to complement the plug-in hybrid (PHEV) version.

It originally only came with a motor on each axle for a combined 300kW and all-wheel drive, while a 72.5kWh battery offered 418km of range.

But then later in 2022, a 170kW single-motor front-drive base model arrived, with a 69kWh battery delivering a driving range of 380km.

The electrical hardware within allows for high-flow recharges. A 50kW DC public fast charger needs 75 minutes to replenish the battery from 10 to 80 per cent full. Otherwise, it’s about 11 hours using an optional 7kW Wallbox at home/work, or seven hours upgrading to an 11kW unit. A regular household plug might take nearly 35 hours.

Reviews have praised the XC40’s speed, agility and refinement, but have criticised the loud tyres and overly-firm suspension over bumpy roads.

Solid and sensible, the interior’s highlights include plenty of space and a big cargo area (452-litre capacity– with another 31 litres in the front boot), exceptionally supportive seating and beautiful fit and finishes.

With a lower entry price, the XC40 Recharge Pure Electric’s success is set to continue in Australia.

Volvo XC40 Recharge Pure Electric (Dual motor shown in brackets)
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/FWD or AWD
Battery: 69kWh (78kWh) Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 170kW/330Nm (300kW/660Nm)
0-100km/h: 7.4s (4.9s)
Consumption: 15.8-19.0 (17.9-25.0) kWh/100km
Electric range: 380km (418km)
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Subaru Solterra (price TBC)

2022 Subaru Solterra electric car

Subaru announced in May 2022 that its first EV, Solterra, would go on sale in Australia in the first half of 2023.

Based on the same underpinnings, body shell and battery as the Toyota BZ4X EV, the Solterra has electric motor on both the front and rear axles, which together have an output of 160kW and 336Nm.

Some markets worldwide are getting a single-motor, front wheel drive (FWD) Solterra, and it’s unclear whether that’ll include Australia.

Solterra’s interior is suitably high-tech, with a large 12.3-inch infotainment screen and a deep, driver-focused pod ahead of the driver which houses the important gauges. There’s generous storage in the central front console area.

If you can find a 150kW charger, the battery be re-energised from 10 percent to 80 per cent in around 30 minutes. A 50kW charger will need about 70 minutes.

The Solterra will get from 0-100km in a brisk 6.9 seconds. Pricing is not confirmed but expect it to be more than $70,000.

More unusually, and in keeping with Subaru’s strong off-road credentials, it will have better off-road capability than most electric SUVs, helped by Subaru’s X-Mode off-roading drive mode, a new grip control function and good ground clearance.

Subaru Solterra
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/FWD or AWD
Battery: 71.4kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 150kW/265Nm (AWD: 160kW/336Nm
0-100km/h: 7.7s
Consumption: 14.4-18.0kWh/100km
Electric range: Up to 516km (FWD, WLTP)
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 10yr/240,000km (TBC) 
Safety rating: N/A

Lexus UX300e from $74,000

2022 Lexus UX 300e electric car

After years of hybrids, Lexus’ first all-electric model is the UX300e.

Aimed directly at the Mercedes-Benz EQA and Volvo C40, it is touted as the “performance flagship” of the popular premium small SUV range, and features a 150kW front-mounted electric motor driving the front wheels.

Fitted with a 54.3kWh lithium-ion battery, some 305km of WLTP driving range is possible. Recharging using the Lexus-provided and installed (for free, and includes two cables) 7kW AC Wallbox needs 6.5 hours, while using a 50kW DC public fast charger will top up to 80 per cent in one hour, or 80 minutes to full.

Note Lexus Australia is also paying for a three-year subscription to Chargefox.

Initial impressions suggest a brisk, smooth and quiet high-riding compact luxury crossover, backed up by a light steering and confident handling. The interior reflects the lofty pricing, with exquisitely built materials and a real luxury ambience. However, rear-seat space is tight for a so-called SUV and the boot is small.

Still, with its attractive styling, urban-friendly proportions, sumptuous cabin, high equipment levels and generous aftersales subscription services that includes conditional free-car loans when travelling, the UX300e has the ability and quality to make the Lexus brand proud.

Lexus UX300e
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/FWD
Battery: 53.4kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 150kW/300Nm
0-100km/h: 7.5s
Consumption: 14.3-16.8 kWh/100km
Electric range: 305km
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 10yr/1,000,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Volvo C40 Recharge from $74,990

2022 Volvo C-40 electric car

Essentially a coupe-crossover version of the boxy XC40 small SUV with a sloping rear roofline, the stylish C40 has the distinction of being the first EV-only Volvo model.

Sourced from China, it launches in Australia later this year, and will follow the Volvo in-house EV brand Polestar’s example of being orderable via online only.

Related to the Polestar 2, the C40 can be had with a front-mounted electric motor driving the front wheels, or a dual-motor version, with a rear-axle-sited unit, bringing all-wheel drive.

While the latter uses a large 78kWh battery pack for an estimated 420km range, the single-motor version uses a lighter 69kWh set-up, to push that out to 434km.

Recharging the smaller battery with a regular household plug requires 35 hours (39hr for the 78kWh battery), falling to around eight hours each with an optional 11kW Wallbox, or about 75 minutes plugged into a 50kW DC public electricity dispenser.

Though classed as a coupe SUV, the stylish C40 is nevertheless a genuine five-seater proposition, and even provides a handy 419 litres of cargo capacity.

Like all modern Volvos, it features a large portrait touchscreen, high-quality materials and industry-leading safety credentials. It ought to prove a hit.

Volvo C40 Recharge (Dual motor shown in brackets)
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/FWD or AWD
Battery: 69kWh (78kWh) Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 170kW/330Nm (300kW/660Nm)
0-100km/h: 7.4s (4.7s)
Consumption: 15.4-19.4 (16.9-22.3) kWh/100km
Electric range: Up to 434km
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Mercedes-Benz EQA from $76,800

2022 Mercedes Benz EQA electric car

Aimed at the Tesla Model Y, Volvo XC40 Recharge and Lexus UX300e, the EQA is a successful high-riding premium hatchback crossover based on the hugely-popular GLA. But like the latter, it is not built on a dedicated EV platform.

The EQA250 FWD’s 140kW single motor offers modest performance, but is tuned for maximum efficiency. Range is rated at 426km. The speedier EQA350 4Matic version uses two motors (one at each axle) for a combined 215kW and all-wheel drive. Both feature a 66.5kWh battery, for a driving range of 426km and 432km respectively.

A 50kW DC fast charger can replenish that battery from 10 to 80 per cent in 63 minutes, or 7.5 hours with an optional 11kW Wallbox at home/work (7kW: 11hr).

The EQA pretty much lifts the GLA’s 10.25-inch touchscreen dashboard wholesale, and that’s no bad thing. Cabin space is reasonable, but the 340-litre cargo capacity is substantially below many rivals. And there’s no additional boot space where the petrol/diesel engines once were.

Standard EQA250 items include adaptive damping and a dynamic steering mode, promoting best-possible ride and handling characteristics.

Note that Mercedes is offering three-years access to Chargefox chargers.

Mercedes-Benz EQA, EQA250/350
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/FWD
Battery: 66.5kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 140kW/375Nm and 215kW/520Nm
0-100km/h: 8.9s/6.0s
Consumption: 15.2-17.5 kWh/100km
Electric range: 426km/432km
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Toyota bZ4X from $80,000 (estimated)

2022 Toyota bZ4X electric car

The bZ4X (for ‘Beyond Zero emissions ‘4’ X-over), expected in Australia late this year or early in 2023, will be Toyota’s first production EV model.

Expected to sit just above the Hyundai Ioniq 5 (from $71,900), the RAV4-esque five-seater midsized SUV introduces a dedicated EV architecture shared with Subaru’s Solterra EV and coming Lexus RZ EVs.

Its flat floor maximises efficiency, creating a spacious, airy and inviting cabin that’s big on quality materials and high-tech features.

A 150kW electric motor up front drives the front wheels, while all-wheel-drive models feature an 80kW motor front and rear, for a combined 160kW output. These outputs seem deliberately conservative to promote long life and reliability – a typical Toyota move.

For now, all grades use a 71.4kWh battery offering up to 516km of range (FWD) or 461km (AWD) versions.

Such a large battery pack means lengthy charge times. Using a normal household plug requires 37 hours, dropping to eight hours with the 11kW on-board charger using an optional 11kW AC Wallbox.

Meanwhile, a 50kW DC fast charger gives an 80 per cent charge from near-empty in 70 minutes, or 32 minutes with a 150kW public outlet.

Strikingly futuristic yet reassuringly familiar inside, the bZ4X should be worth the wait.

Toyota bZ4X
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/FWD or AWD
Battery: 71.4kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 150kW/265Nm (AWD: 160kW/336Nm
0-100km/h: 7.7 to 8.4s
Consumption: 14.4-18.0kWh/100km
Electric range: Up to 516km (FWD, WLTP)
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 10yr/240,000km (TBC) 
Safety rating: TBC

Ford Mustang Mach-E from $80,000 (estimated)

2022 Ford Mustang Mach electric car

The Mustang Mach-E was one of the most highly anticipated EV releases ahead of it’s US launch in late 2020.

Sharing nothing but a few styling cues with the American sports car legend, the Mach-E is a five-door SUV pure and simple, using an electrified version of the related Ford Escape’s architecture.

Order books for Australian market Mach-Es are set to open late this year, ahead of a 2023 release, so pricing and specification details aren’t yet known. Production is either out of Mexico or China.

Abroad, electric motor outputs currently range between 198kW and 358kW, battery sizes are 68kWh (Standard Range) and 88kWh (Extended Range), in either rear-mounted single-motor or front/rear-mounted dual-motor configurations. Note the Mach-E with AWD has absolutely no off-road capabilities.

Living up to the Mustang mythology, the GT Performance Edition can hit 100km/h in 3.8s while the Extended Range models can manage over 600km between recharges.

While not as spacious as its SUV/crossover styling suggests, the liftback shape underlines the family-friendly packaging. The Mach-E is also a step forward for Ford interior design, adopting fashionable multi-screen tech and quality materials.

Evocative styling, stirring performance, great handling, and comparatively fast charging capabilities round out a unique and emotional EV proposition. Demand should be very strong so get in early.

Ford Mustang Mach-E
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/RWD or AWD
Battery: 68-88kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 198/216/258/358kW and 430/580Nm
0-100km/h: 3.8-6.1s
Consumption: 16.5-19.5kWh/100km 
Electric range: 400-610km (WLTP)
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Genesis GV60 from $90,000 (estimated)

2022 Genesis Electrified GV60 electric car

Hyundai luxury brand Genesis goes electric with the curvaceous GV60.

Related to the acclaimed Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6, the stylish midsized luxury SUV is chasing Lexus UX 300e, Volvo C40 and Tesla Model Y buyers.

Three powertrain choices exist, ranging from a 168kW single-motor/rear-drive, 234kW dual-motor all-wheel drive (AWD) and 320kW AWD Sports, the latter offering a 360kW overboost function for extra thrust.

All feature a 77.4kWh battery, with a WLTP range of between 368km and 516km. The Genesis can also accommodate a 350kW DC ultra-fast charger; find one and it replenishes from 10 to 80 per cent in just 18 minutes!

The more-common 50kW DC charger still needs only 65 minutes, an (optional) 11kW three-phase Wallbox at home/work goes to 100% in eight hours, while ‘Vehicle to Load’ (V2L) capability allows the Genesis to act like a big-appliance generator. Handy when camping out.

Design-wise, the GV60 follows the coupe-SUV/crossover look to reflect its athletic performance, while some standout tech features include video side mirrors, facial recognition entry and fingerprint reader gear-shift release.

Factor in value pricing, lots of equipment and plenty of safety tech, and it’s clear Genesis is serious about leading the luxury EV SUV pack.

Genesis GV60 (168kW Premium/234kW Sport AWD/320kW Sport+ AWD)
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/RWD or AWD
Battery: 77.4kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 168/234/360kW and 350/605/700Nm
0-100km/h: 7.3/5.2/4.0 seconds
Consumption: 20.1/19.3/14.1kWh/100km 
Electric range: Up to 516km (WLTP)
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: N/A

Mercedes-Benz EQB from $90,000 (estimated)

2022 Mercedes Benz EQB electric car

Mercedes-Benz’s big-selling GLB seven-seater midsized SUV goes electric with the EQB.

Joining the related smaller EQA, the EQB launches with two grades: the EQB250 and EQB350 4Matic, with others to follow later.

You’ll spot it because of the usual blanked-out grille and unique headlight and wheel treatments, as well as a redesigned tailgate with the EQ-signature horizontal LED tail-light motif.

Although both launch EQBs include a sizeable 66.5kWh battery pack, the base EQB250 drives only the front wheels via a front-mounted 140kW electric motor that stretches range out to 474km (WLTP).

The EQB350, meanwhile, leverages a dual-motor configuration, thanks to the addition of a rear-mounted electric motor, for all-wheel drive Mercedes calls 4Matic. Total system power output is 215kW.

A 50kW DC public fast-charger will fill the battery from 10 to 80 per cent in around 70 minutes.

Packaging-wise, the EQB brings full five-seater space plus two occasional seats (rated for people up to 1.65m tall) out back. The middle row slides to vary the amount of cargo space on offer, further upping the Benz’s practicality. In five-seater mode luggage capacity is 465 litres; folding the centre bench ups that to around 1620L.

Roomy, compact and versatile, the EQB is an expensive but welcome seven-seater EV option.

Mercedes-Benz EQB (EQB350 4Matic AWD shown in brackets)
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/AWD
Battery: 66.5kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 140kW/385Nm (215kW/520Nm)
0-100km/h: 9.2s (6.2s)
Consumption: 16.5kWh/100km (18.4kWh/100km)
Electric range: 474km (416km) WLTP
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

BMW iX3 from $114,900

2022 BMW iX3 electric car

An electrified version of the popular X3 medium-sized SUV, the iX3 uses BMW’s fifth-gen eDrive technology, so doesn’t sit on a dedicated EV architecture like the newer iX.

Still, with a 210kW/400Nm electric motor to drive the rear wheels only, it brings both spirited performance (0-100km/h needs just 6.8 seconds) and impressive efficiency.

Conversely, up to 460km of range is promised from an underfloor-sited 80kWh battery, with regenerative braking technology harnessing otherwise spent energy to help recharge that while on the move.

If you find a 50kW DC public fast charger, the iX3’s battery pack can be replenished from 10 to 80 per cent in about 75 minutes – or else the optional 7kW or 11kW Wallbox need 12 or eight hours respectively.

Otherwise, the iX3 is as-per the existing X3, boasting a spacious and practical interior with ample room for five occupants, as well as high quality materials.

BMW’s latest OS 7.0 multimedia system is fitted, capable of over-the-air updates. A special technology pipes in changeable ‘driving manoeuvres’ sounds through the audio system. Passenger comfort benefits from adaptive dampers that prioritise softness.

The iX3 is also the first China-built BMW sold in Australia.

BMW iX3
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/RWD
Battery: 80kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 210kW/400Nm
0-100km/h: 6.8s
Consumption: 18.5kWh/100km
Electric range: 460km
Warranty: 3yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Genesis Electrified GV70 from $120,000 (estimated)

2022 Genesis Electrified GV70 electric car

Also known as the eGV70, the Electrified GV70 is Hyundai luxury brand Genesis’ take on the BMW iX3 and Mercedes-Benz EQC.

Like its German rivals, the eGV70 is an electrified version of an internal combustion engined vehicle and so is unrelated to the lauded E-GMP dedicated EV architecture as per the smaller GV60, Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6 trio.

Compared to its petrol and diesel-powered siblings, the eGV70 boasts a blanked-out grille (with a charge port), redesigned bumpers and missing exhaust pipes.

A single powertrain choice is offered for now, with a 160kW electric motor at each end of the SUV, though a brief overboost feature pushes the combined maximum output up to 360kW. It’s no slouch as a result, either, managing the 0-100km/h sprint in just 4.2 seconds.

Genesis claims the 77.4kWh battery’s range should easily exceed 400km, while a 800-volt charging capability means a 350kW rapid charger will top the battery up from 10 to 80 per cent in under 20 minutes. And, like GV60, a V2L function allows for electrical appliances to be powered outside of the vehicle.

Speaking of which, some mild off-road capability is possible, with modified traction settings available in ‘e-Terrain Mode’.

Genesis Electrified GV70
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/RWD or AWD
Battery: 77.4kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 320kW/700Nm (360kW on overboost)
0-100km/h: 4.2s
Consumption: 21.7kWh/100km (South Korean data)
Electric range: Over 400km (claimed)
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Genesis Electrified G80 from $120,000 (estimated) (estimated)

2022 Genesis Electrified G80 electric car

Genesis is forging fresh ground in Australia with the Electrified G80 – an EV rival to the still-combustion-engined Audi A6, BMW 5 Series and Mercedes-Benz E-Class.

Sitting at the top of the regular G80 sedan range, the Electrified uses a modified combustion-engine platform, rather than a dedicated EV architecture like the smaller GV60. Visual giveaways are the blanked-out grille, absent tailpipes and different alloy wheel designs.

Claimed to have over 500km of range (on the more-lenient NEDC cycle), the large sedan will feature two 136kW electric motors (one on each axle), for a total power output of 272kW. The 100km/h dash takes under five seconds.

A torque-vectoring system means it can switch between rear-drive and AWD modes to help boost efficiency and range, while an 800V electrical system means the battery can be charged from 10 – 80 per cent full in just 22 minutes using a 350kW DC station. As per other Genesis EVs, there’s a V2L feature to power electrical items outside of the car.

Finally, noise cancelling tech uses the vehicle’s audio system to neutralise unwanted sounds, while the adaptive suspension uses forward-facing cameras to ‘read’ the road ahead and ‘prepare’ the dampers accordingly.

Genesis Electrified G80
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/AWD
Battery: 47.8/62.4kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 272kW/700Nm
0-100km/h: 4.9s seconds
Consumption: TBC
Electric range: Over 500km (NEDC)
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Mercedes-Benz EQC from $124,300

2022 Mercedes Benz EQC electric car

Surprisingly Mercedes’ first EV in Australia, the EQC is based on the GLC medium SUV, but shares no body or interior panels.

Designed to be highly user-friendly, it seats five people comfortably, boasts a large cargo area and is packed with equipment, backed up by a full array of driver-assist safety.

With a combined 300kW from two electric motors for all-wheel drive, the EQC400 4Matic is a strong performer, bringing seamless urge for something so large. Furthermore, the electric Benz transcends its size through tight turns, thanks to a low centre of gravity.

Another highlight is the EQC’s brilliant refinement, pampering its occupants in isolated luxury even over bad or bumpy roads. If only all Mercedes models rode this well.

Fitted with an 80kWh battery pack, the German EV charges from 10 to 80 per cent in 75 minutes using a 50kW DC public fast charger. Otherwise, 100% full using an optional 11kW or 7kW Wallbox at home/work takes nine hours and 13 hours respectively, to avoid a 41-hour plugged into a regular wall socket.

The EQC is an exceptionally easy and comfortable first EV effort for Mercedes. Expensive options aside, there’s much to recommend.

Mercedes-Benz EQC400
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/AWD
Battery: 80kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 300kW/760Nm
0-100km/h: 5.1s
Consumption: 21.4kWh/100km
Electric range: 417km
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

BMW iX from $135,900

2022 BMW iX xDrive 50 electric car

If the BMW iX really represents the future, then we’re here for it.

Currently available in three models – 270kW xDrive40, 370kW xDrive50 and 455kW M60 – the large SUV is the Bavarian brand’s electrified SUV flagship for now.

Ushering in BMW’s fifth-generation eDrive drivetrain with an electric motor on each axle and aided by excellent aerodynamics, the iX is quick by any standards.

The 40 is fitted with a big 77kWh battery, while the 50 and M60 boast a mammoth 111kWh item.

A 50kW DC public fast charger will take the 50’s battery from 10 to 80 per cent in 95 minutes. Otherwise, it’s about 11 and 17 hours using an optional 11kW or 7kW Wallbox at home/work respectively, to avoid nearly two days plugged into a regular wall socket!

The iX employs a lightweight aluminium spaceframe and a carbon-fibre ‘safety cage’, assisting efficiency whilst making it ultra-strong. The optional air suspension also brings an amazingly soft ride.

To maximise cabin space, the iX banishes the central transmission tunnel. Highlights include body-hugging front seats, 14.9-inch touchscreen powered by BMW’s latest OS 7.0 operating system, a 12.3-inch digital instrumentation cluster and sustainable yet gorgeous materials throughout.

BMW iX xDrive50, xDrive60, M60
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/AWD
Battery: 77kWh or 111kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 240kW/630Nm, 385kW/765Nm, 455kW/1100Nm
0-100km/h: 6.1, 4.6, 3.8s
Consumption: 20.3, 20.8, 21.7kWh/100km
Electric range: 425, 630, 566km
Warranty: 3yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Audi e-tron SUV from $139,900

2022 Audi e-tron SUV electric car

Audi’s e-tron is a progressive medium-sized luxury SUV.

It launched in 2020 with two battery-pack models – the 230kW 50 with 71kWh and 300kW 55 with 95kWh. Located on each axle, a pair of electric motors drive all four wheels.

Both grades offer instantaneous acceleration, competent steering and excellent roadholding, but the 55 is more-closely aligned with the (smaller) Jaguar I-Pace and Mercedes EQC rivals in terms of range and performance.

Meanwhile, the bonkers 370kW S arrived in 2022, brandishing two electric motors at the rear and one up front – a volume-production first – as well as the 95kWh battery.

The e-tron’s WLTP range varies from 341 to 441km. A 50kW DC public fast charger will take the 55’s 95kWh battery from 10 to 80 per cent in under 80 minutes. Otherwise, it’s about nine and 14 hours using an optional 11kW or 7kW Wallbox at home/work, to avoid 44 hours-plus plugged into a regular wall socket.

The e-tron’s rich interior offers an abundance of space and practicality, a massive boot, air suspension for a cocooning ride and plenty of high-tech gadgets. However, desirable options are expensive.

Note Audi is offering six years of free public charging, scheduled servicing and roadside assistance.

Audi e-tron 50, 55 and S
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/AWD
Battery: 71kWh or 95kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 230kW/540Nm, 300kW/664Nm, 370kW/973Nm
0-100km/h: 6.8s, 5.7s, 4.5s
Consumption: 23.6, 22.0, 27.0kWh/100km
Electric range: 341, 441, 374km
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Jaguar I-Pace EV400 from $142,580

2022 Jaguar I Pace electric car

If the I-Pace cannot shake Jaguar’s pipes-and-slippers reputation, nothing can

A bolt from the blue, the Austrian-built I-Pace is a sleek five-seater crossover sitting on a dedicated EV platform.

Its family-orientated SUV packaging results in ample space for five adults, sumptuous seating and a big boot beneath that practical rear hatch, while the high-tech, elegantly styled dash features intuitive controls, tactile materials and plenty of storage.

In 2021, a revamp saw a faster-performing onboard AC charger, a redesigned multimedia system, better cameras, improved cabin air filtration system and over-the-air updates capability.

With an electric motor at each end driving all four wheels, acceleration is startling, accompanied by a turbine whoosh. With AWD, carving up corners quickly and securely is another I-Pace strength, emphasising the Jaguar’s high-speed balance and control.

The 90kWh battery pack needs 44 hours using a normal home socket, nearly 14 hours using an optional 7kW Wallbox at home/work, or nine hours with an 11kW Wallbox. Otherwise, a 50kW DC public fast charger requires just 75 minutes for a 10 to 80 per cent top-up.

Downsides include some un-premium plastics inside, poor rear vision and expensive options. Still, the I-Pace has catapulted Jaguar to the pointy end of the EV world.

Jaguar I-Pace
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/AWD
Battery: 90kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 249kW/696Nm
0-100km/h: 4.8s
Consumption: 18-22 kWh/100km
Electric range: 470km
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Audi e-tron Sportback from $150,900

2022 Audi e-tron Sportback electric car

The e-tron Sportback is essentially an e-tron SUV but with a sleeker shape, 20mm less headroom and a shallower luggage area. Other than these, the are identical under the skin.

This means two battery-pack models – the 230kW 50 comes with a 71kWh item while the 300kW 55 and more-recent 370kW S upgrade to a bigger 95kWh pack.

The flagship S features two electric motors at the rear and one up front – a volume-production first – as opposed to the regular versions’ one-more-per-axle set-up, for reassuring all-wheel drive grip.

The Sportback is identically refined yet rapid off the line, providing a quiet and calm driving experience, backed up by slightly sharper steering for more-involving cornering. Meanwhile, the standard air suspension balances fine control and a comfy ride; along with the sumptuous cabin, it is consistent with Audi’s luxury reputation.

A 50kW DC public fast charger will take the 55’s 95kWh battery from 10 to 80 per cent in under 80 minutes. Otherwise, it’s about nine and 14 hours using an optional 11kW or 7kW Wallbox at home/work, to avoid 44 hours-plus plugged into a regular wall socket.

Audi offers six years of free public charging, scheduled servicing and roadside assistance.

Audi e-tron Sportback 50, 55 and S
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet  
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/AWD
Battery: 71kWh or 95kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 230kW/540Nm, 300kW/664Nm, 370kW/973Nm
0-100km/h: 6.8s, 5.7s, 4.5s
Consumption: 23.2, 22.7, 27.0kWh/100km
Electric range: 350, 452, 380km
Warranty: 5yr/unlimited
Battery warranty: 8yr/160,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Tesla Model X from $165,990

 2022 Tesla Model X electric car

Billed as the world’s safest SUV, the striking Model X is heavily derived from the Model S liftback sedan.

Available in five, six or seven-seater formats, there is a massive amount of space inside, while accessing the expansive cabin’s third row via the novel, upward opening‘Falcon Wing’ doors is easy.

The interior is largely Model S-derived, meaning that the cabin was also completely overhauled for 2021, with a new dash, better quality materials, improved rear seating and a jet-fighter-style quartic steering wheel.

With an electric motor on each axle for all-wheel drive, the Model X has no problem getting its prodigious power to the ground, for brutally muscular yet silky performance. The tri-motor Plaid breaks SUV acceleration records. It also corners as if magnetised to the road, backed up by pleasingly cushy suspension.

As per the Model S, recharging takes time – using a regular household plug needs about 50 hours, the optional Wallbox cuts that to over 15 hours (7kW) or 10 hours (11kW), while Tesla’s Supercharging Network rams these times down to between 23 minutes and 57 minutes, depending on how much power is going through.

The styling is controversial and pricing can be stratospheric, but the Model X is arguably the world’s most interesting SUV.

Tesla Model X Long Range (Plaid shown in brackets)
Motor: Synchronous electric permanent-magnet
Transmission/drive: Single-speed reduction gear/AWD
Battery: 100kWh Lithium Ion
Power/torque: 500kW/>750Nm (760kW/>1000Nm)
0-100km/h: 3.9s (2.6s)
Consumption: 19.4 (20.4) kWh/100km
Electric range: 560km (536km)
Warranty: 4yr/80,000km
Battery warranty: 8yr/240,000km
Safety rating: 5 stars

Electric range is quoted using the World harmonised Light vehicle Testing Procedure (WLTP), or otherwise are manufacturers’ claims.

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Last updated: May 2022